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Jackson James, PhD

Scientist - EII, Neuro Stem Cell Biology Lab

+91-471-2529480 (Office) ,+91-471-2529478 (Office)

+91-471-2529480

jjames@rgcb.res.in

Jackson-James
Jackson-James

Jackson James, PhD

Scientist E-II, Neuro Stem Cell Biology

+91-471-2529480 (Office) ,+91-471-2529478 (Office)

jjames@rgcb.res.in

+91-471-2529480

  • Profile

    • PhD Biotechnology (Molecular Neurobiology) (Cochin University of Science & Technology, Cochin, India) – 1994-1999
    • M.Sc Biotechnology (Cochin University of Science & Technology, Cochin, India) – 1992-1994
    • B.Sc Zoology (University of Kerala, Trivandrum, India) – 1989-1992
    • April 2013-till date, Scientist-EII, Neurobiology Division, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala-695014, India
    • April 2009-March 2013, Scientist-E1, Neurobiology Division, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala-695014, India
    • March 2004-March 2009, Scientist-C, Neurobiology Division, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala-695014, India
    • 2000-2003, Post-doctoral Research Associate, Lied Transplant Centre, Dept. of Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA.
    • 1999-2000, Post-doctoral research associate, Molecular Medicine, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology, Kerala, India.
    • (2004, Fast Track Scheme): DST young scientist award Department of Science & Technology.
    • April 2000 -Dec 2000: Research Associate ship Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR).
    • 1994: M.Sc. Biotechnology 4th Rank Cochin University of Science & Technology.
    • Society for Biotechnologists,India,
    • Indian Academy of Neuroscience, India,
    • Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), USA.,
    • Society for Neuroscience, USA.,
    • Society for Neurochemistry, India

    Ph.D students being trained/awarded

    • PhD students being trained: 5
    • PhD's awarded: 6
    • Dr. Indulekha CL received the Dr. MR Das career award for the best outgoing Ph.D. student, September 2011.
    • Dr. Sanalkumar R S received the Dr. MR Das career award for the best outgoing Ph.D. student, March 2012.
    • Dr. Divya MS received the Dr. MR Das career award for the best outgoing Ph.D. student, March 2014.
    • Dr. Abdul Rasheed V received the Dr. MR Das career award for the best outgoing Ph.D. student, October 2015
    • Dr. Divya TS was awarded Ph.D. in January 2017.
    • Dr. Dhanesh S received the Dr. MR Das career award for the best outgoing Ph.D. student, February 2017
  • Research

    NEURO-STEM CELL BIOLOGY LABORATORY

    The main focus of our lab is to understand the early developmental cues that promote neural stem cell maintenance and fate specific differentiation which will shed light in developing possible therapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative diseases. Our research programs are very clearly classified into two broad programs: 1) To understand the basic cues that are responsible for the various functions such as maintenance of neural stem cells, fate specification, differentiation and how the differentiated cells form proper connections in various regions of developing brain. We study these fundamental mechanisms in the developing brain and retina by modulating various extrinsic and intrinsic components such as Notch and Wnt signaling, transcription factors and miRNAs in neural cell lines and transgenic/Knockout mouse models. 2) The second part focuses on mimicking the early developmental cues to enhance proliferation of endogenous stem cell population, fate specific differentiation and formation of proper synaptic connections. We also use ES cells, Umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells and disease modeled iPS cells for generating fate specified neurons/organoids and understanding its therapeutic potential and pathophysiology


    Overall the programs of the lab are divided into the following:

    1. Understanding the role of Notch and Wnt signaling in neocortical and cerebellar development.

     During the development of mammalian nervous system, neurons and glia are generated from a common germinal zone containing both neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural progenitors (NPs). The regulatory events that distinguish between these two proliferative neural cell types and their fate, remain poorly understood. We have previously shown the presence of neural stem cell/progenitor population which are maintained by FGF2 through activation of Hes-1, a well-established Notch receptor target. Surprisingly this activation of Hes-1 in these cells was independent of Notch and was mediated non-canonically through JNK-ATF2 signaling (Sanalkumar et.al. J. Neurochem., 113 (2010) 807-818; Sanalkumar et al Cell. Mol. Life. Sci., 67 (2010) 2957-2968). Based on this finding, we proposed to further characterize this differential regulation of Hes-1 with respect to the maintenance, proliferation and fate specific differentiation of Notch independent neural progenitors in mammalian CNS.  In canonical Notch signaling Notch complexes with CBF1, an intermediate factor, which identifies and binds to specific sequences on the Hes-1 promoter, resulting in its activation. In order to address this scenario qualitatively and quantitatively, a series of Hes-1reporter constructs were made with mutated CBF1 binding sites (CBS). Even though the subsequent mutation at each CBS significantly caused gradual decrease in Hes-1 expression, it has been maintained, more likely, in a small subset of population of cells and could be attributed to the cross-talk with alternate signaling pathways such as Wnt, JNK, ERK and Shh. Further extrapolating our results in vivo using in utero electroporation with these reporter systems, we have clearly demonstrated that in developing neo-cortex, Notch-independent Hes-1 (NIHes-1) expression is restricted to neural stem cells and Notch-dependent Hes-1 (NDHes-1) expression is found in neural progenitors/radial glial cells (Dhanesh et al, Cerebral Cortex; 2016, 1-19, DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhw207). This basically gave an insight to the significant differences between two very closely related populations. Though Hes-1 expression is maintained in neural progenitors, a transition from Notch-independent to dependent state makes it pleotropic as the former maintains the neural stem cells in a non-dividing/slow dividing state, whereas the latter is very much required for maintenance and proliferation of radial glial cells.


     In addition to Notch signaling in neocortical development, we looked into another signaling mediated by Wnts since wnt signaling has shown significant roles in CNS development. We observed that Wnt5a, in a non-canonical manner, regulates cerebellar development which is not clearly understood. The development of cerebellum with well-defined cytoarchitecture involves multiple regulatory mechanisms during embryonic and postnatal development. In this study, we have unraveled the spatiotemporal expression pattern of Wnt5a along with its functional significance in cerebellum. Using Nestin-Cre mediated Wnt5a conditional knockout model, we demonstrated that Wnt5a mediates the proliferation of cerebellar GABAergic and glutamatergic neural progenitors in a dynamic manner which consequently affects the differentiation of respective neurons (GABAergic and glutamatergic) during early and late phase of development.In addition, we showed that Wnt5a exerts its function in a non-canonical manner and at molecular level regulates the expression of genes associated with proliferation such as cyclin D1 and Sox2 which further is in line with our in vivo results. These findings prove Wnt5a signaling as one of the crucial regulator of cerebellar development. Further investigation to identify the pathway through which Wnt5a regulates proliferation may provide useful insights in better understanding of cerebellar disease pathogenesis that are caused due to deregulation of Wnt signaling (Subashini et.al., Sci. Rep: 2017, 7, 42523; doi: 10.1038/srep42523).

    Collaborator: Dr. Rejji Kuruvilla, Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA

     2. Functional characterization of homeobox gene Tlx3 (Hox11L2) in cerebellar development and its link to Autistic spectral disorders (ASD)

    Neurogenesis is a developmental process by which new neurons are generated from neural stem cells whereas neuronal subtypes are generated through fate specification from the progenitor pool. Neuronal subtypes mainly include excitatory and inhibitory neurons which utilize glutamate and GABA neurotransmitters, respectively. Different factors regulate neurogenesis and neuronal subtype specification in a highly sophisticated manner. A set of genes known as terminal selector genes are capable of inducing or specifying a particular neuronal fate over its complementary fate. One such important gene is Tlx3 that belongs to the Tlx family of Homeobox domain transcription factors, which has been identified as a major selector gene that determines the glutamatergic neuronal fate over GABAergic fate in the embryonic spinal cord. Therefore, it would be ideal to understand the factors that regulate Tlx3 expression and also the functional significance of the progenitors/neurons that express Tlx3. We found that Hes-1 can play a critical role in deciding the excitatory versus inhibitory fate of neural progenitors by regulating the expression of Tlx3 gene which is involved in promoting glutamatergic differentiation (Indulekha et al., Cell. Mol. Life. Sci, (2012) 69:611-627). It is known that Tlx3 is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of CNS and is known to promote glutamatergic differentiation. Contrary to this, we discovered that Tlx3 is expressed in the proliferating progenitors of the external granular layer in the cerebellum, and examined factors that regulate this expression. Using Pax6-/-Sey mouse model and molecular interaction studies we demonstrated that Pax6 is a key activator of Tlx3 specifically in cerebellum,  and induces its expression starting at embryonic day (E)15.By Postnatal day (PN), Tlx3 was found to be expressed in a highly restricted manner in the cerebellar granular neurons of the posterior cerebellar lobes, where it is required for the restricted expression of nicotinic cholinergic receptor-α3 subunit (Chrnα3) and other genes involved in formation of synaptic connections and neuronal migration(Divya et al, Sci Rep, (2016) 30337, DOI: 10.1038/srep30337). To further confirm our findings regarding Tlx3/Chrnα3 cascade, we analyzed Chrnα3 expression and found that its expression was entirely absent in Pax6-/- Sey cerebellum. Also we observed that Chrnα3 was co-expressed with Tlx3 in the post-mitotic EGL and in the cells that are migrating into the prospective IGL. Since Chrnα3 is linked with neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autistic Spectral Disorders (ASD), we are currently looking into the possibility whether Tlx3 could play a role in ASD.


    Collaborators: Dr. Shubha Tole, Associate Professor, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India


    3. Development of a cell therapy strategy to treat glaucoma using retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) generated from embryonic stem (ES) cells/ Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world. It is a chronic disorder caused due to the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons which transmit the visual information from the eye to the brain. Elevated intra ocular pressure (IOP) remains the etiological factor towards which major therapeutic efforts are directed, although none of the treatment modalities could bring back the lost  treatment modalities could bring back the lost RGCs and hence the visual function cannot be restored. We are currently looking into a possible method for increasing the number of RGC by transplanting ES cells that has been induced to differentiate into RGCs. Such a strategy will help in replenishing the lost RGCs to some extent. Towards this end our laboratory has successfully optimized a novel protocol for generating RGCs from ES cells by modulating the extrinsic growth factors and manipulating the neurogenesis signaling pathway (Jagatha et al. BBRC; 2009; 230-235). These ES cell-derived RGCs were able to integrate into the host retina and were proven to be functional when transplanted in glaucoma animal models through better cell integration and vision recovery compared to that of the non-transplanted animals. Our results have shown that partial visual functions can be reversed in RGG depleted NMDA model by transplantation of ES cell-derived RGCs. Success of the above strategy could help to treat glaucoma using cell replacement therapy. As part of a parallel program to identify heterologous sources for neural/RGC differentiation we have identified a very unique population of progenitors from umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells which has an inherent potential to differentiate into neurons (Divya et.al. Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 2012; 3:57). The remaining MSCs have to be transdifferentiated into neurons with combination of growth factor exposure for a longer time period. In addition to addressing the above problems, our lab also concentrates on identifying the miRNAs and their role in RGC differentiation and axonal extension to the visual centers of the brain. In view of the recent advances in post-transcriptional regulation by miRNA in retina we have looked into the miRNAs that could potentially target RGC specific Marker,Brn3b and thereby regulate RGC differentiation during development. We adopted an in silico approach to predict the miRNAs involved in regulating Brn3b and selected mmu-miR-23a and mmu-miR-374 for further analysis, since these two were picked up by multiple programs. We were able to demonstrate for the first time, that these two miRNAs, not individually but in combination, would affect the expression of Brn3b in the ganglion cell layer of retinal explant cultures. Also, we provide evidences for the existence of a co-ordinated mechanism controlling the wave of Brn3b expression mediated through miR-23a and miR-374, which will ultimately regulate the development of RGCs from their progenitors and later their survival and axonal guidance (Rasheed et al 2014, Developmental Neurobiology, 74: 1155–1171). Although we have observed an integration of ES-NPs in the adult retina and expressing RGC markers, the details regarding the functional attributes such as axonal extension and guidance are lacking. Hence, currently we are focusing on the molecules involved in the axonal extension process and their regulation in the mice models.



    Collaborators: Dr. GS Vinod Kumar, Chemical Biology Group, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Kerala, India

    Dr. Samer Hatter, Department of Neuroscience (JHMI), 227 Mudd Hall, Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA

    Dr. KE Elizabeth, SAT Hospital, Trivandrum, Kerala, India

    Openings in Neuro-Stem Cell Biology Laboratory:

    JRF/SRF Positions: We expect to have one JRF position by Feb-March 2017. Please keep watching RGCB web site for advertisements.
    Ph.D Positions:
    Candidates for Ph.D program are selected through a written test and interview conducted by RGCB once in a year. Please go through RGCB web site for more details.
    Post-Doctoral Positions: Interested candidates are encouraged to initially contact the PI with a short write up of the proposed work plan. Please visit RGCB website for selection criteria.

  • Publications

    1. Chandramohan Subashini, Sivadasan Bindu Dhanesh, Chih-Ming Chen, Paul Ann Riya, Vadakkath Meera, Thulasi Sheela Divya, Rejji Kuruvilla, Kerstin Buttler & Jackson James; Wnt5a is a crucial regulator of neurogenesis during cerebellum development: Scientific Reports, 7 (2017) 42523; doi: 10.1038/srep42523.
    2. Thulasi Sheela Divya, Soundararajan Lalitha, Surendran Parvathy, Chandramohan Subashini, Rajendran Sanalkumar1, Sivadasan Bindu Dhanesh, Vazhanthodi Abdul Rasheed, Mundackal Sivaraman Divya, Shubha Tole & Jackson James; Regulation of Tlx3 by Pax6 is required for the restricted expression of Chrnα3 in Cerebellar Granule Neuron progenitors during development: Scientific Reports, 6 (2016) 30337, DOI: 10.1038/srep30337.
    3. Sivadasan Bindu Dhanesh, Chandramohan Subashini, Paul Ann Riya, Vazhanthodi Abdul Rasheed & Jackson James; Pleiotropic Hes-1 concomitant with its differential activation mediates neural stem cell maintenance and radial glial propensity in developing neocortex: Cerebral Cortex (2016)1-19, DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhw207.
    4. Sivadasan Bindu Dhanesh, Chandramohan Subashini & Jackson James: Hes1: The maestro in neurogenesis; Cell. Mol. Life. Sci (2016), DOI: 10.1007/s00018-016-2277-z.
    5. Anupama Vijayakumar, Aneesh Chandran, Sivadasan Bindu Dhanesh, Jackson James, K. Shivakumar: Molecular mechanisms in H2O2-induced increase in AT1 receptor gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts: a role for endogenously generated Angiotensin II; Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology (2016, In Press)
    6. Mereena George, Anupama Vijayakumar, Sivadasan Bindu Dhanesh, Jackson James, K. Shivakumar: Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts; Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, 90 (2016) 59–69.
    7. Vazhanthodi A Rasheed, Sreekumaran Sreekanth, Sivadasan B Dhanesh, Mundackal S Divya, Thulasi S Divya, Palakkottu K Akhila, Chandramohan Subashini, Krishnankutty Chandrika Sivakumar, Ani V Das & Jackson James. Developmental wave of Brn3b expression leading to RGC fate specification is synergistically maintained by miR-23a and miR-374; Developmental Neurobiology, 74 (2014) 1155–1171.
    8. Nishit Srivatsava, Jackson James and KS Narayan. Morphology and electrostatics play active role in neuronal differentiation processes on flexible conducting substrates; Organogenesis  (2014)10:1, 1-5.
    9. Sasidharan  Shashikala, Rohith Kumar, Nisha E. Thomas, Dhanesh Sivadasan, Jackson James and Suparna Sengupta. Fodrinin Centrosomes: Implication of a role of Fodrin in the transport of Gamma-Tubulin Complex in Brain; PLOS One 8(2013)e76613.
    10. Nishit Srivastava, Vijay Venugopalan, Divya MS, Rasheed VA, Jackson James# and K. S. Narayan#. Neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem cell derived neuronal progenitors can be regulated by stretchable conducting polymers; Tissue Engineering, 2013, 19(17-18)1984-1993.  #Corresponding Authors.
    11. Mundackal Sivaraman Divya, Roshin Elizabeth George, Thulasi Sheela Divya, Vazhanthodi Abdul Rasheed, Retnabai Thankayyan Santhoshkumar, Kandathil Eapen Elizabeth, Jackson James# & Radhakrishna  M Pillai. Umbilical Cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells consist of a unique population of progenitors co-expressing MSC and neuronal markers capable of instantaneous neuronal differentiation; Stem Cell Research & Therapy, (2012) 3:57 doi:10.1186/scrt148. #Corresponding Author.
    12. Praveen K. Sobhan, Mahendra Seervi, Jeena Joseph, Saneesh Varghese, Prakash Rajappan Pillai, Divya Mundackal Sivaraman, Jackson James, Roshin Elizabeth George, K.E. Elizabeth, T.R. Santhoshkumar & M. Radhakrishna Pillai. Immortalized Functional Endothelial Progenitor Cell Lines from Umbilical Cord Blood for Vascular Tissue Engineering; Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods, 2012, Vol. 18, No. 11: 890-902
    13. Indulekha CL, Divya TS, Divya MS, Sanalkumar R, Abdul Rasheed VT, Dhanesh SB, Anu Sebin, Amitha George & Jackson James. Hes-1 regulates the excitatory fate of neural progenitors through modulation of Tlx3 (HOX11L2) expression, Cell. Mol. Life. Sci, (2012) 69:611–627 (Research Article).
    14. Lekha Nair K, Vidyanand S, Jackson James and G S Vinod Kumar. Pilocarpine loaded PLGA nanoparticles as potential candidate for controlled drug delivery with enhanced ocular pharmacological response;Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 2012, 124(3): 2030-2036.
    15. Sivakumar KC, Dhanesh SB, Sekar Shobana,Jackson Jamesand Sathish Mundayoor. A Systems Biology Approach to model Neuronal Stem Cell regulation by Notch, Sonic Hedgehog, Wnt, EGF signaling pathways; OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, 2011, 15(10): 729-737.
    16. KK Saju, JayadasNH, Sasidharan Vidyanand, Jackson James: Investigations into the molecular level adhesion characteristics of Hydroxyapatite coated and anodized titanium surfaces using molecular orbitalapproach; Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal of Engineering in Medicine, 225:3 (2011) 246-254.
    17. Sanalkumar R, Dhanesh SB & Jackson James: Non-canonical activation of Notch signaling/target genes in vertebrates; Cell. Mol. Life. Sci., 67 (2010) 2957–2968.
    18. Indulekha CL, Sanalkumar R, Anoopkumar Thekkuveettil & Jackson James: Seizure induces activation of multiple subtypes of neural progenitors and growth factors in hippocampus with neuronal maturation confined to dentate gyrus; Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 393 (2010) 864–871.
    19. Sanalkumar R, Indulekha CL, Divya TS, Divya MS, Anto RJ,Vinod B, Vidyanand S, Jagatha B, Venugopal S & Jackson James:ATF2 maintains a subset of neural progenitors through CBF1/Notch independent Hes-1 expression and synergistically activates the expression of Hes-1 in Notch dependent neural progenitors; J. Neurochem., 113 (2010) 807–818. (Cover page article)
    20. Sanalkumar R,  Vidyanand S, Indulekha CL & Jackson James: Neuronal vs. glial fate of embryonic stem cell derived neural progenitors (ES-NPs) is determined by FGF2/EGF during proliferation; J. Mol. Neurosci.,42 (2010)17–27.
    21. Rajeevkumar, R., Suma Priya, S., Mayadevi, M., Mathew Steephan, Santhoshkumar, T. R., John Cheriyan, Sanalkumar, R., Pradeep, K. K., Jackson James, and Omkumar R. V.: Phosphorylation status of the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor regulates its interaction with Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II; J. Neurochem., 110 (2009) 92-105.
    22. B Jagatha, MS Divya, R Sanalkumar, CL Indulekha,  S Vidyanand, TS Divya, AV Das & Jackson James: In vitro differentiation of retinal ganglion-like cells from embryonic stem cell derived neural progenitors; Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 380 (2009) 230-235.
    23. K.K.Saju, Reshmi.R, P.S.Sreejith , Jayadas.N.H, Jackson James, M.K.Jayaraj: Polycrystalline coating of Hydroxyapatite on TiAl6V4 implant material grown at lower substrate temperatures by hydrothermal annealing after pulsed laser deposition; Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal of Engineering in Medicine, 223:8 (2009) 1049-1057.
    24. K.K. Saju, Sasidharan Vidyanand, N.H. Jayadas, Jackson James, M.K. Jayaraj: Effect of surface characteristics of Anodized Ti-6Al-4V implant material on Osteoblast attachment and proliferation, J.Orthopaedics 2009;6(1)e5 (URL: http://www.jortho.org/2009/6/1/e5)
    25. A.V. Das, J. James, S. Bhattacharya, A.N. Imbalzano, M.L. Antony, G. Hegde, X. Zhao, K. Mallya, F. Ahmad, E. Knudsen, and I. Ahmad: SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling ATPase, BRM regulates the differentiation of early retinal stem cells/progenitors by influencing BRN3B expression and notch signaling: J. Biol. Chem, 282 (2007) 35187-201.
    26. G.V. Hegde, J. James, A.V. Das, X. Zhao, S. Bhattacharya, and I. Ahmad, Characterization of early retinal progenitor microenvironment: Presence of activities selective for the differentiation of retinal ganglion cells and maintenance of progenitors. Experimental Eye Research, 84 (2007) 577-590.
    27. Ani V. Das , Xing Zhao , Jackson James , Min Kim, Kenneth H. Cowan , Iqbal Ahmad: Neural stem cells in the adult ciliary epithelium express GFAP and are regulated by Wnt signaling: Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commu.,339 (2006) 708–716.
    28. Ani V. Das, Sreekumaran Edakkot, Wallace B. Thoreson, Jackson James, Sumitra Bhattacharya, and Iqbal Ahmad: Membrane properties of retinal stem cells/progenitors: Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, 24 (2005) 663-81.
    29. Ani V. Das, Jackson James, Jörg Rahnenführer, Wallace B. Thoreson, Sumitra Bhattacharya, Xing Zhao, and Iqbal Ahmad:  Retinal properties and potential of the adult mammalian ciliary epithelium stem cells: Vision Research  45 (2005) 1653–1666.
    30. Jackson James, Ani V. Das, Jörg Rahnenführer and Iqbal Ahmad; Cellular and molecular characterization of early and late retinal stem cells/progenitors: Differential regulation of proliferation and context dependent role of Notch signaling: Journal of Neurobiology, 61(2004) 359-376.
    31. Ani V. Das, Jackson James, Xing Zhao, Jörg Rahnenführer and Iqbal Ahmad; Identification of c-Kit receptor as a regulator of adult neural stem cells in the vertebrate eye: Interactions with Notch signaling: Dev. Biol.,273 (2004) 87-105.
    32. Iqbal Ahmad, Ani V. Das, Jackson James, Sumitra Bhattacharya and Xing Zhao; Neural stem cells in the mammalian eye: types and regulation: Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology, 15(2004) 53-62.
    33. Jackson James, Ani V. Das, Sumitra Bhattacharya, David M. Chacko, Xing Zhao and Iqbal Ahmad; In Vitro generation of early-born neurons from late retinal progenitors: Journal of Neuroscience, 23[23] (2003) 8193-8203.
    34. Constance M. Dooley, Jackson James, C. Jane McGlade and Iqbal Ahmad; Involvement of Numb in vertebrate retinal development: Evidence for multiple roles of Numb in neural differentiation and maturation:  Journal of Neurobiology, 54(2003) 313-325.
    35. David M. Chacko, Ani Das, Xing Zhao, Jackson James, Sumitra Bhattacharya and Iqbal Ahmad; Transplantation of ocular stem cells: The role of injury in incorporation and differentiation of grafted cells in the retina:  Vision Research, 43[8] (2003) 937-946.
    36. Sumitra Bhattacharya, John D. Jackson, Ani V. Das, Wallace B. Thoreson, Charles Kuszynski, Jackson James, Shantaram Joshi and Iqbal Ahmad; Direct identification and enrichment of retinal stem cells/progenitors by Hoechst dye efflux assayInvestigative  Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 44[6] (2003) 2764-2773.
    37. Xing Zhao, Ani V. Das, Wallace B. Thoreson, Jackson James, Tami E. Wattnem, Jorge Rodriguez-Sierra and Iqbal Ahmad ; Adult corneal limbal epithelium: a model for studying neural potential of non-neural stem cells/progenitors:  Developmental Biology, 250 (2002) 317-331.
    38. J.Jackson and C.S. Paulose; Brain 5HT2A receptor regulation by tryptophan supplementation in streptozotocin diabetic rats: J. Biochemistry Molecular Biology & Biophysics, 5 (2000) 1-7.
    39. Jackson .J and Paulose C.S; Enhancement of [m-methoxy 3H] MDL100907 binding to 5-HT2A receptors in cerebral cortex and brain stem of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats: Molecular & Cellular Biochemistry, 199 (1999) 81-85.
    40. Jackson James, Pius S. Padayatti, Thomas Paul and C.S. Paulose; Platelet monoamine changes in diabetic patients and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats: Current Science, 72 (1997) 137-139.
    1. Parvathy S and Jackson James; Functional significance of Tlx3 expression in developing cerebellum and its link to Autistic Spectrum Disorders: XXXIV Annual Meeting of Indian Academy of Neurosciences (IAN) October 19-21, 2016, NBRC, Manesar, INDIA
    2. Riya Ann Paul and Jackson James; Differential mode of Hes-1 activation is required for maintenance of neural stem cells and its transition into radial glial cells in developing neocortex: XXXIV Annual Meeting of Indian Academy of Neurosciences (IAN) October 19-21, 2016, NBRC, Manesar, INDIA
    3. Lalitha S and Jackson James ; Identifying mechanisms involved in guiding retinal ganglion cell axons to brain visual centers during retinal development: XXXIV Annual Meeting of Indian Academy of Neurosciences (IAN) October 19-21, 2016, NBRC, Manesar, INDIA
    4. Elucidation of role of Wnt signaling in cerebellar neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis: from stem cells to therapies conference. Subashini C, Dhanesh S B, Divya T S and Jackson James. Adult neurogenesis: from stem cells to therapies conference, TIFR, Mumbai, February 2014.
    5. Characterization of neural progenitors having Notch independent Hes-1 expression in developing neocortex. Dhanesh S B, Subashini C and Jackson James. Adult neurogenesis: from stem cells to therapies conference, TIFR, Mumbai, February 2014.
    6. Novel Role of Tlx3 as a Mitotic factor and its Regulation by Pax6 during Cerebellar Granule Neuron Development. Divya T S, Subashini C, Dhanesh S B, Abdul Rasheed V T & Jackson James . Adult neurogenesis: from stem cells to therapies conference, TIFR, Mumbai, February 2014
    7. Transcriptional regulation of Tlx3 by Pax6 and its influence on excitatory vs. inhibitory neural fate specification in Cerebellum. Divya T S & Jackson James. 37th All India Cell Biology Conference & Symposium on Cell Dynamics & Cell Fate, Bangalore, December 2013.
    8. RGC differentiation from ES cells: Influence of FGF2 and Notch Signaling. Divya M S, Vazhanthodi Abdul Rasheed, Hattar Samer, James Jackson. The Association for Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) 2013 Annual Meeting, Seattle, Washington, May 05 - 09, 2013.
    9. Regulation of retinal ganglion cell fate specification and differentiation by miR-23a and miR-374 during retinal development Abdul Rasheed VT, Sreekanth S, Divya MS, Divya TS, Dhanesh SB, Subashini C, Ani Das V & Jackson James. 43rd Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, November 9-13, 2013, San Diego, CA.
    10. Maintenance, proliferation and fate specific differentiation of neural progenitors having Notch independent Hes-1 expression. S.B. Dhanesh, C. Subashini, T.S. Divya, Jackson James, XXXth Indian Academy of Neurosciences meet and International Symposium, Guru Nanak Dev University, October 27-30, 2012, Amritsar, Punjab.
    11. Characterisation of Pax2 mediated regulatory mechanisms involved in cerebellar neurogenesis. C. Subashini, S.B. Dhanesh, T.S. Divya, Jackson James, XXXth Indian Academy of Neurosciences meet and International Symposium, Guru Nanak Dev University, October 27-30, 2012, Amritsar, Punjab.
    12. Functional relevance of miR-23a in Retinal Ganglion Cell fate specification. Abdul Rasheed VT, Divya M S and J James. XXXth Indian Academy of Neurosciences meet and International Symposium, Guru Nanak Dev University, October 27-30, 2012, Amritsar, Punjab.
    13. Fate specific differentiation of neural stem cells maintained by differential Hes-1 expression. S.B. Dhanesh, C. Subashini, T.S. Divya,Jackson James , 19th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Developmental Neuroscience, 11-14 January 2012, Mumbai, India.
    14. Identification of microRNA involved in development and differentiation of Retinal Ganglion Cells. VT Abdul Rasheed and Jackson James. 19th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Developmental Neuroscience, 11-14 January 2012, Mumbai, India.
    15. Human Umbilical cord blood derived Mesenchymal stem cells with inherent neurogenic potential. M S Divya, E G Roshin, K E Elizabeth, Jackson James. 19th Biennial Meeting of the International Society of Developmental Neuroscience (ISDN), Mumbai January 11-14, 2012.
    16. Isolation, characterization and neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood. Divya M S, T S Divya, E G Roshin, C L Indulekha, K E Elizabeth, T R Santhosh Kumar, Jackson James., 7th International stem cell school in regenerative medicine, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, November 2-4, 2009.
    17. Hes-1 acts as transcriptional repressor of Tlx3, a selector gene in excitatory over inhibitory neural fate determination. Indulekha CL, Sanalkumar RS, Divya MS, Abdul Raseed VT & Jackson James; 39th annual meeting of Society for Neuroscience, Chicago, IL, 2009, USA.
    18. A subset of neural progenitors is maintained by ATF-2 mediated non-canonical activation of Hes-1 expression. R. Sanalkumar, C. L. Indulekha, T. S. Divya, M. S. Divya, S. Vidyanand, R. J. Anto, J. James; 39th annual meeting of Society for Neuroscience, Chicago, IL, 2009, USA.
    19. Notch signaling regulates the expression of Tlx3, a selector gene in excitatory over inhibitory neural fate determination. Indulekha CL, Sanalkumar RS, Divya MS, Abdul Rasheed VT and Jackson James. Presented on 6th international stem cell school in regenerative medicine, held at, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark, June2009
    20. Divya MS, Divya TS, Sanalkuma RS, Indulekha CL, John Francis, Vidyanand S, Vinod Kumar GS and Jackson James ; Development of a cell therapy strategy to treat glaucoma using retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) generated from embryonic stem (ES) cells, Young Investigators Meeting, Poovar, February 24th -28th, 2009.
    21. Jagatha B, Sanalkumar RS, Indulekha CL, Vidyanand S, Divya MS and Jackson James; FGF2 induces generation of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) from ES cells: Enhanced by Sonic hedgehog: Model Organisms and Stem Cells in Development, Regeneration and Disease, NCBS, Bangalore February 23-25, 2008.
    22. Indulekha CL, Sanalkumar RS, Jagatha B, Anu Sebin, Amitha George, Divya MS and Jackson James; Regulation of Tlx3 (HOX11L2) gene in neural progenitors: Role of Notch signaling: Model Organisms and Stem Cells in Development, Regeneration and Disease, NCBS, Bangalore February 23-25, 2008.
    23. Sanalkumar RS, Jagatha B, Indulekha CL, Shammey S, Vidyanand S, Divya MS, Ruby John Anto and Jackson James; A novel Notch independent activation of Hes-1 through JNK maintains ES cell derived neural progenitors: Model Organisms and Stem Cells in Development, Regeneration and Disease, NCBS, Bangalore February 23-25, 2008.
    24. Sanalkumar RS, Indulekha CL and Jackson James; Effect of growth factors on neuron specific differentiation of embryonic stem cells: SETNS 2005 & XXIII Annual Conference of Indian Academy of Neurosciences at NIMHANS, Bangalore Dec 11-14, 2005.
  • Team


    Subashini C PhD Student, CSIR-SRF

    My research involves elucidating the role of Wnt pathway in neural cell fate specification during CNS development.

    abdul
    abdul

    Subashini C PhD Student, CSIR-SRF

    My research involves elucidating the role of Wnt pathway in neural cell fate specification during CNS development.

    Lalitha S, PhD Student, DST INSPIRE-SRF

    My work involves delineating the fundamental concept regarding identification of factors involved in the axonal extension of RGCs to the brain visual centres.

    abdul
    abdul

    Lalitha S, PhD Student, DST INSPIRE-SRF

    My work involves delineating the fundamental concept regarding identification of factors involved in the axonal extension of RGCs to the brain visual centres.

    Riya Ann Paul, PhD student, CSIR-SRF

    My work entails elucidation of molecular mechanisms involved in the transition of Notch Independent Hes-1 expressing neural stem cells to Notch Dependent Hes-1 expressing neural progenitors during neocortical development.

    danesh
    danesh

    Riya Ann Paul, PhD student, CSIR-SRF

    My work entails elucidation of molecular mechanisms involved in the transition of Notch Independent Hes-1 expressing neural stem cells to Notch Dependent Hes-1 expressing neural progenitors during neocortical development.

    Parvathy S, PhD Student, CSIR-JRF

    My work relates to identifying the functional relevance of TLX3 expression in developing cerebellum.

    danesh
    danesh

    Parvathy S, PhD Student, CSIR-JRF

    My work relates to identifying the functional relevance of TLX3 expression in developing cerebellum.

    Meera V, PhD Student, CSIR-JRF

    My interest orbits around the role of Notch and related regulatory pathways in the maintenance and fate specification of neural progenitors.

    danesh
    danesh

    Meera V, PhD Student, CSIR-JRF

    My interest orbits around the role of Notch and related regulatory pathways in the maintenance and fate specification of neural progenitors.

    Biju S Nair ,Technical Assistant- Gr. II

    My roles in the lab are maintenance of stock registers, assisting the students with their experiments and general upkeep of the lab.

    biju
    biju

    Biju S Nair ,Technical Assistant- Gr. II

    My roles in the lab are maintenance of stock registers, assisting the students with their experiments and general upkeep of the lab.

    Sreeja S, Project assistant-KSETC

    I am involved in providing technical assistance in the project and other routine lab experiments.

    sreeja
    sreeja

    Sreeja S, Project assistant-KSETC

    I am involved in providing technical assistance in the project and other routine lab experiments.

  • Alumni


    Dr. Dhanesh S B (2009-2017)

    Post Doctoral fellow
    Duke University, USA

    divya
    divya

    Dr. Dhanesh S B (2009-2017)

    Post Doctoral fellow
    Duke University, USA

    Dr. Divya T S (2012-2017)

    Scientist
    Thermo Fisher, Bangalore

    divya
    divya

    Dr. Divya T S (2012-2017)

    Scientist
    Thermo Fisher, Bangalore

    Dr. Abdul Rasheed V T (2008-2014)

    Assistant Professor
    Govt. College, Chittor,
    Kerala, India

    divya
    divya

    Dr. Abdul Rasheed V T (2008-2014)

    Assistant Professor
    Govt. College, Chittor,
    Kerala, India

    Dr. Divya MS, 2007-2013

    Post-Doctoral Researcher
    Cell Conversion Technology Unit
    RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies
    Yokohama, Japan-2300045

    divya
    divya

    Dr. Divya MS, 2007-2013

    Post-Doctoral Researcher
    Cell Conversion Technology Unit
    RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies
    Yokohama, Japan-2300045

    Dr. Sanalkumar R S, 2005-2010

    Faculty, CHUV, Lausanne
    Switzerland
    Former Post Doctoral Fellow
    Prof. Emery Bresnick's lab
    University of Wisconsin
    Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Center

    sanal
    sanal

    Dr. Sanalkumar R S, 2005-2010

    Faculty, CHUV, Lausanne
    Switzerland
    Former Post Doctoral Fellow
    Prof. Emery Bresnick's lab
    University of Wisconsin
    Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Center

    Dr. Indulekha C L, 2005-2010

    Asst. Professor,
    Amrita University
    Former Post Doctoral Fellow
    Dr. Arjun Deb’s Lab
    Cardiac repair and regeneration group
    David Geffen School of Medicine
    University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

    indulekha
    indulekha

    Dr. Indulekha C L, 2005-2010

    Asst. Professor,
    Amrita University
    Former Post Doctoral Fellow
    Dr. Arjun Deb’s Lab
    Cardiac repair and regeneration group
    David Geffen School of Medicine
    University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

    Sreekanth S, 2012-2013

    PhD student
    Dr G Muraleedharkurup's Lab
    Department of Biochemistry
    University of Kerala

    sreekanth
    sreekanth

    Sreekanth S, 2012-2013

    PhD student
    Dr G Muraleedharkurup's Lab
    Department of Biochemistry
    University of Kerala

    Vidyanand S, 2007-2010

    Senior Research Fellow
    Dr. Dasaradhi Palakodeti's Lab
    Instem, Bangalore

    vidyanand
    vidyanand

    Vidyanand S, 2007-2010

    Senior Research Fellow
    Dr. Dasaradhi Palakodeti's Lab
    Instem, Bangalore

    Jagatha Balusami, 2007-2008

    Bangalore

    jagatha
    jagatha

    Jagatha Balusami, 2007-2008

    Bangalore

    Raji Lenin, 2006-2007

    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation
    Chennai

    raji
    raji

    Raji Lenin, 2006-2007

    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation
    Chennai