Profile

Research

Publications

Team

Alumni

M Radhakrishna Pillai, FRCPath, PhD

Director/Professor

+91-471-2347973

mrpillai@rgcb.res.in

mrp
mrp

M Radhakrishna Pillai, FRCPath, PhD

Director/Professor

+91-471-2347973

mrpillai@rgcb.res.in

  • Profile

    • FRCPath, The Royal College of Pathologists, London
    • MRCPath, The Royal College of Pathologists, London
    • PhD Degree, University of Kerala, India
    • Fellow, Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore
    • Fellow, National Academy of Sciences, Allahabad
    • Fellow, National Academy of Medical Sciences
    • Chairman, Institutional Committee for Stem Cell Research, Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute of Medical Sciences & Technology, (Government of India), Thiruvananthapuram
    • Member, Governing Body of Translational Health Sciences & Technology Institute Society, (Government of India, Department of Biotechnology)
    • Member, Research Advisory Panel & Scientific Advisory Council, National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi (Government of India, Department of Biotechnology)
    • Member, Research Advisory Panel & Scientific Advisory Committee, National Centre for Cell Sciences, Pune (Government of India, Department of Biotechnology)
    • Member, Senate, University of Kerala
    • Member, Executive Committee, Kerala State Council for Science, Technology & Environment
    • Member, Kerala Biotechnology Commission and Kerala Biotechnology Board
    • Member, Kerala Innovation Council
    • Member, Academic Committee, Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute of Medical Sciences & Technology, (Government of India), Thiruvananthapuram.

    • 2003: National Bioscience Career Award, Department of Biotechnology, Government of India
    • 2000: Recipient of the Indian Council of Medical Research Sandoz Oration Award for Outstanding Cancer Research in the field of Human Papillomavirus Research
    • 1991: Recipient of the Indian Council of Medical Research Raja Ravi Sher Singh Award for outstanding Cancer Research by a young scientist in recognition for PhD work on “Development of an Immunological Staging System for cervical cancer”
    • Fellow, International Union Against Cancer (UICC)
    • Life Member, Indian Association for Cancer Research
    • Member, Indian Immunology Society
    • Member, Institute of Biology, London
    • Member, British Society of Immunology
    • Member, Indian Association of Biomedical Scientists
    • Twenty PhDs mentored to date all in academics or scientific positions
    • Ten ongoing PhD students
    • Patent titled “Novel porphyritic derivatives for photo dynamic therapy (PDT): A process for the preparation and thereof and their use as PDT agents and fluorescence probes for biological applications”, D. Ramaiah, S. C. Karunakaran, V. S. Jisha, T. K. Chandrashekar, A. Sreenivasan, M. R. Pillai, S. A. Nair, S. B. P. Saras, C. M. Rao, K. S. Rao., Dated 14-Sep-2009 (Ref. No. 0147NF2009)
  • Research

    Investigating the natural history of human immune responses to influenza virus infections in an unvaccinated population

    Influenza A is a devastating pathogen to humans, causing significant yearly morbidity and mortality, and periodic deadly pandemics. The recent 2009 influenza pandemic killed 1 in 8,300 Americans with direct and indirect costs estimated at $90 billion. This same pandemic stuck India in May of 2009, where over 45,000 laboratory-confirmed cases and over 3,000 deaths were reported. The actual number of cases and deaths are likely to have been far higher. Billions of dollars have been spent on preparedness including antiviral therapeutics and influenza vaccine development and manufacture. Unfortunately, these vaccines offer incomplete protection against infection and complications due to influenza (up to 50% to 70% failure rates in the very young, old, and immunocompromized individuals). Accurate markers or models that explain the development of protective immunity to influenza, or predict vaccine failure in Indian populations would be incredibly useful in developing appropriate vaccines and immunization schedules relevant to the Indian population, currently the second largest population group on the planet. The current study is collaborative one with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, USA funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Biotechnology. We will recruit an elderly (ages 50-74) Indian population for our study. Our first objective is to characterize longitudinal humoral immune responses and transcriptomic profiles at set time points before (day 0) and after (days 3, 28, and 75) influenza vaccination. We will then examine correlations between gene expression and immune outcomes at each time point. Our second objective is to identify immune profiles at day 0 and/or day 3 that correlate with vaccine immunogenicity at day 28. Completing these aims will provide a dataset on an Indian population that can be compared and contrasted to an existing dataset on an elderly US population. The use of these two populations allows us to compare human subjects with preexisting immunity due to natural infections vs. immunity due to vaccination. This comparison will provide a unique opportunity to identify immunoregulatory mechanisms at work in each population and immune pathways shared by both. This proposal brings together the full expertise of Mayo Clinic in the US and the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology in India.The proposed work is significant because it will give us crucial insight into the potential downside (or upside) of not having an active annual influenza vaccination program in India.

    1. Establishment of a National Virology Network Laboratory. Indian Council of Medical Research, 2011–2016.
    2. Systems Biology Assessment of Influenza A/ pH1N1 vaccination in an Indian cohort. National Institutes of Health and Department of Biotechnology, 2014–2017.
    3. Identifying Systems-level Cellular Networks Involved in Neurotropic Flavi Virus- Host Interaction. Department of Biotechnology, 2015-2018.
    4. Understanding measles vaccine failure (and success) in Southern India. RGCB-MAYO CLINIC & EMORY UNIVERSITY, NIH RO-1, USA, 2015-2020.
  • Publications

    Publications 2014 – 2015

    Total Research Publications: 204 (As on September , 2016)
    As Corresponding or Senior Author: 111; As First Author: 47; As Co-author: 46

    1. Muraleedharan Parvathy, Sreeharshan Sreeja, Rakesh Kumar and Madhavan Radhakrishna Pillai. Potential role of p21 Activated Kinase 1 (PAK1) in the invasion and motility of oral cancer cells. BMC Cancer. 2016 May 16;16 Suppl 1:293. doi: 10.1186/s12885-016-2263-8.
    2. Srinivas KP, Viji R, Dan VM, Sajitha IS, Prakash R, Rahul PV, Santhoshkumar TR, Lakshmi S, Pillai MR. DEPTOR promotes survival of cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells and its silencing induces apoptosis through downregulating PI3K/AKT and by up-regulating p38 MAP kinase. Oncotarget. 2016 Mar 16. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.8131. [Epub ahead of print]
    3. Dr Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan, Priya Ramesh Prabhu, Michael Pawlita, Tarik Gheit, Neerja Bhatla, Richard Muwonge, Bhagwan M Nene, Pulikottil Okuru Esmy, Smita Joshi, Usha Rani Reddy Poli, Parimal Jivarajani, Yogesh Verma, Eric Zomawia, Prof Maqsood Siddiqi, Prof Surendra S Shastri, Kasturi Jayant, Sylla G Malvi, Eric Lucas, Angelika Michel, Julia Butt, Janki Mohan Babu Vijayamma, Subha Sankaran, Thiraviam Pillai Rameshwari Ammal Kannan, Rintu Varghese, Uma Divate, Shila Thomas, Geeta Joshi, Martina Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Tim Waterboer, Martin Müller, Peter Sehr, Sanjay Hingmire, Prof Alka Kriplani, Gauravi Mishra, Sharmila Pimple, Radhika Jadhav, Catherine Sauvaget, Massimo Tommasino, Prof Madhavan Radhakrishna Pillai. Immunogenicity and HPV infection after one, two, and three doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine in girls in India: a multicentre prospective cohort study. The Lancet Oncology. 1 December 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(15)00414-3
    4. Rajaraman P, Dey B, Majumder PP, Mayor S, Pillai MR, Ramaswamy S, Shaha C, Johnson M, Sivaram S, Trimble EL, Harlow EE, VijayRaghavan K. First International Workshopson Provocative Questions (PQ) in Cancer Research, October-November 2014, New Delhi, Bengaluru, and Thiruvananthapuram, India, J Cancer Policy. 2015 Dec 1;6:33-36.
    5. Krishnan S, Dhillon PK, Bhadelia A3, Schurmann A, Basu P, Bhatla N, Birur P, Colaco R, Dey S, Grover S, Gupta H, Gupta R, Gupta V, Lewis MA, Mehrotra R, McMikel A, Mukherji A, Naik N, Nyblade L, Pati S, Radhakrishna Pillai M, Rajaraman P, Ramesh C, Rath GK, Reithinger R, Sankaranarayanan R, Selvam J, Shanmugam MS, Shridhar K, Siddiqi M, Squiers L, Subramanian S, Travasso SM, Verma Y, Vijayakumar M, Weiner BJ, Reddy KS, Knaul FM, Report from a symposium on catalyzing primary and secondary prevention of cancer in India. Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Nov;26(11):1671-84. doi: 10.1007/s10552-015-0637-x. Epub 2015 Sep 3.
    6. Azeez JM, Sithul H, Hariharan I, Sreekumar S, Prabhakar J, Sreeja S, Pillai MR. Progesterone regulates the proliferation of breast cancer cells – in vitro evidence, Drug Des Devel Ther. 2015 Nov 9;9:5987-5999.
    7. Das AV, Pillai MR. Implications of miR cluster 143/145 as universal anti-oncomiRs and their dysregulation during tumorigenesis, Cancer Cell Int. 2015 Sep 29;15:92. doi: 10.1186/s12935-015-0247-4. eCollection 2015
    8. Seetha Dayakar, Iravathy K. Goud, Heera Pillai, Viji Remadevi, Sanjai Dharmaseelan, Radhakrishnan R. Nair, M. Radhakrishna Pillai. Molecular Diagnosis of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Dengue virus (DENV) and its concomitant circulation in South Indian population, Virology Reports, 12 May 2015 doi:10.1016/j.virep.2015.05.001
    9. Ramakrishnan L, Pillai MR, Nair RR Dengue vaccine development: strategies and challenges. Viral Immunol. 2015 Mar;28(2):76-84. doi: 10.1089/vim.2014.0093. Epub 2014 Dec 10.
    10. HezlinMarzook*, Deivendran S*, Rakesh Kumar, Pillai MR. Role of MTA1 in Head and Neck cancer. Cancer and Metastasis Reviews, 33(4):953-64, December 2014
    11. Rajesh Raju, Aswathy Paul, Vivekanand Asokachandran, Bijesh George, Lekshmi Radhamony, Meena Vinaykumar, Reshmi Girijadevi, Pillai MR. The Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Database: an omics platform for reference, integration and analysis of triple-negative breast cancer data. Breast Cancer Research 2014, 16:490 (4 December 2014)
    12. S Deivendran, K Hezlin Marzook, Pillai MR. The role of inflammation in cervical cancer. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology ; 816:377-99, (2014)
    13. V C Dhanya, P J Sara, Dharmaselan Sanjai, Fetle Amar, P M Deepa, G R Santosh, V T Jisa and M R Pilai. Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak in Kerala, Southern India. British Microbiology Research Journal 4(10): 142-153, 2014
    14. Zinia T. Nujum, Achu Thomas, K. Vijayakumar, Radhakrishnan R. Nair, Pillai MR, P S Indu, Syam Sundar, Soumya Gopakumar, Devi Mohan, T. K. Sudheeshkumar. Comparative performance of the probable case definitions of dengue by WHO (2009) and the WHO-SEAR expert group (2011) Pathogens and Global Health 2014, 108, Issue 2, pp. 103-110
    15. Paul Sebastian, Janki Mohan Babu, R Prathibha, Ramkumar Hariharan, and Pillai MR. Anterior tongue cancer with no history of tobacco and alcohol use may be a distinct molecular and clinical entity. Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine 2014 (Online Version)
    16. Joshi, J.M. Babu, D. Jayalakshmi, V. Kulkarni, U. Divate, R. Muwonge,T.Gheit, M. Tommasino, R. Sankaranarayanan, Pillai MR. "Human papillomavirus infection among human immunodeficiency virus-infected women in Maharashtra, India." Vaccine 32 (2014) 1079 - 1085.
    17. Ramachandran S, Venugopal A, Kutty VR, A V, G D, Chitrasree V, Mullassari A, Pratapchandran NS, Santosh KR, Pillai MR, Kartha CC. Plasma level of cyclophilin A is increased in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggests presence of vascular disease. Cardiovasc Diabetol 13:38. doi: 10.1186/1475-2840-13-38, 2014.
  • Team


    Sara Jones, Post-Doctoral Fellow

    Although the recent 2009 pH1N1 pandemic has increased interest in influenza research, public health infrastructure and preparedness, influenza surveillance, vaccine production capacity, and use of influenza vaccines in India, much more can and should be done. Unfortunately, vaccine use is still sporadic and infrequent, especially among those most at risk. Vaccine efficacy studies have shown that current pH1N1 vaccines are safe and effective in multiple Indian cohorts, but that seroprotection may be slightly lower (74.7% vs 82.1%) than in European/American cohorts. This may be due to viral factors, host genetics, environment, nutrition, or other factors. My main objective is to develop innovative immune profile signatures that explain and predict inter-individual variations in immune responses to influenza A/H1N1 vaccines specifically and viral vaccines generally. Another important goal is to compare and contrast immunologic and transcriptomic profiles following influenza vaccination in the Caucasian and Indian populations. The use of these two populations allows us to compare human subjects with pre-existing immunity due to natural infections vs. immunity due to vaccination. Knowledge regarding the mechanisms of influenza vaccine-mediated immunogenicity and protection will assist in developing the optimal vaccine products and immunization schedules relevant to the Indian populations most at risk. In addition to this I am also involved in the sero-survey of seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza virus outbreaks in Kerala. The critical need of population based serology has been advocated to determine the extent of infection and age specific infection rates. Wide geographical variations are expected in the incidence of infection in different populations. Therefore serosurvey is necessary to understand the extent of the infection and may provide appropriate denominator for pandemic severity estimates and the data for delineation of risk populations for priority in vaccination.

    SARA JONES
    SARA JONES

    Sara Jones, Post-Doctoral Fellow

    Although the recent 2009 pH1N1 pandemic has increased interest in influenza research, public health infrastructure and preparedness, influenza surveillance, vaccine production capacity, and use of influenza vaccines in India, much more can and should be done. Unfortunately, vaccine use is still sporadic and infrequent, especially among those most at risk. Vaccine efficacy studies have shown that current pH1N1 vaccines are safe and effective in multiple Indian cohorts, but that seroprotection may be slightly lower (74.7% vs 82.1%) than in European/American cohorts. This may be due to viral factors, host genetics, environment, nutrition, or other factors. My main objective is to develop innovative immune profile signatures that explain and predict inter-individual variations in immune responses to influenza A/H1N1 vaccines specifically and viral vaccines generally. Another important goal is to compare and contrast immunologic and transcriptomic profiles following influenza vaccination in the Caucasian and Indian populations. The use of these two populations allows us to compare human subjects with pre-existing immunity due to natural infections vs. immunity due to vaccination. Knowledge regarding the mechanisms of influenza vaccine-mediated immunogenicity and protection will assist in developing the optimal vaccine products and immunization schedules relevant to the Indian populations most at risk. In addition to this I am also involved in the sero-survey of seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza virus outbreaks in Kerala. The critical need of population based serology has been advocated to determine the extent of infection and age specific infection rates. Wide geographical variations are expected in the incidence of infection in different populations. Therefore serosurvey is necessary to understand the extent of the infection and may provide appropriate denominator for pandemic severity estimates and the data for delineation of risk populations for priority in vaccination.

    Pradip V Fulmali, Project Officer

    The life or death consequences of infection vary both by virus and by cell type, ranging from rapid killing of host cells to complete blockage of host-induced cell death. Thus viruses appear to be able to intervene at all steps of eukaryotic cell death, either to prevent death or to provoke it. Viral manipulation of molecular switches in these pathways is often essential to the effective propagation and dissemination of infectious progeny. My research is intended to explicit the different aspect of virus-host interaction using West Nile virus as model. The main research question, I would like to answer is how west nile virus mange to induce wide spectrum of disease in the human host by manipulating the different molecules in cell death pathways. By unraveling the specific details concerning manipulation of cell death in virus infected cell, we may reveal novel therapeutic targets and aid in improved antiviral and vaccine design, as well as gain a clearer insight into the complex machinery of eukaryotic cell death.

    Pradip-V-Fulmali
    Pradip-V-Fulmali

    Pradip V Fulmali, Project Officer

    The life or death consequences of infection vary both by virus and by cell type, ranging from rapid killing of host cells to complete blockage of host-induced cell death. Thus viruses appear to be able to intervene at all steps of eukaryotic cell death, either to prevent death or to provoke it. Viral manipulation of molecular switches in these pathways is often essential to the effective propagation and dissemination of infectious progeny. My research is intended to explicit the different aspect of virus-host interaction using West Nile virus as model. The main research question, I would like to answer is how west nile virus mange to induce wide spectrum of disease in the human host by manipulating the different molecules in cell death pathways. By unraveling the specific details concerning manipulation of cell death in virus infected cell, we may reveal novel therapeutic targets and aid in improved antiviral and vaccine design, as well as gain a clearer insight into the complex machinery of eukaryotic cell death.

    Heera Pillai R, Senior Research Fellow

    It is estimated that influenza affects 5-10% of adults and 20-30% of children globally every year causing significant levels of illness, hospitalization and death. The 2013 global pandemic of H1N1influenza is still currently active in 207 countries including India. There is therefore a critical need to develop more effective strategies for combating this deadly disease. The aim of my project is to develop human monoclonal antibodies against influenza viruses. The underlying principle of this study is to identify memory B cells from healthy individuals in the age category 70 to 90, in the belief that they would have had previous exposure to various strains of the virus. These cells will then be subsequently used to identify and clone antibody genes which will then be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. Such antibodies generated will be screened against different types of influenza viruses. In addition to a possible therapeutic significance, antibodies so generated will be useful to screen banked and prospective serum samples for molecular epidemiology studies.

    Heeraa
    Heeraa

    Heera Pillai R, Senior Research Fellow

    It is estimated that influenza affects 5-10% of adults and 20-30% of children globally every year causing significant levels of illness, hospitalization and death. The 2013 global pandemic of H1N1influenza is still currently active in 207 countries including India. There is therefore a critical need to develop more effective strategies for combating this deadly disease. The aim of my project is to develop human monoclonal antibodies against influenza viruses. The underlying principle of this study is to identify memory B cells from healthy individuals in the age category 70 to 90, in the belief that they would have had previous exposure to various strains of the virus. These cells will then be subsequently used to identify and clone antibody genes which will then be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. Such antibodies generated will be screened against different types of influenza viruses. In addition to a possible therapeutic significance, antibodies so generated will be useful to screen banked and prospective serum samples for molecular epidemiology studies.

    Anjana S Nair, Junior Research Fellow

    At the population level, influenza A represents a devastating pathogen to humans, causing significant yearly morbidity and mortality, and periodic deadly pandemics. Unfortunately, vaccines offer incomplete protection against infection and complications due to influenza. The elderly have been considered as the priority group for influenza vaccination, but their influenza vaccine-induced antibody was believed to decline more rapidly, mainly because of the adaptive immune system’s inability to generate protective immunity. I am involved in the humoral immunological assays of these elderly human subjects to compare pre-existing immunity due to natural infections vs. immunity due to vaccination.

    anjana
    anjana

    Anjana S Nair, Junior Research Fellow

    At the population level, influenza A represents a devastating pathogen to humans, causing significant yearly morbidity and mortality, and periodic deadly pandemics. Unfortunately, vaccines offer incomplete protection against infection and complications due to influenza. The elderly have been considered as the priority group for influenza vaccination, but their influenza vaccine-induced antibody was believed to decline more rapidly, mainly because of the adaptive immune system’s inability to generate protective immunity. I am involved in the humoral immunological assays of these elderly human subjects to compare pre-existing immunity due to natural infections vs. immunity due to vaccination.

  • Alumni


    Dr. S Lakshmi

    Associate Professor
    Molecular Medicine
    Regional Cancer Centre
    Trivandrum
    Phone: +91 471 2522280 (O)

    dr.lekshmi
    dr.lekshmi

    Dr. S Lakshmi

    Associate Professor
    Molecular Medicine
    Regional Cancer Centre
    Trivandrum
    Phone: +91 471 2522280 (O)

    Dr. Asha S Nair

    Scientist E-II
    Cancer Research
    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

    asha
    asha

    Dr. Asha S Nair

    Scientist E-II
    Cancer Research
    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

    Dr. A. Lakshmi Kesari

    Senior Lecturer & Coordinator GRU
    General Requirements Program (GRU)
    Fatima College of Health Sciences
    Al Ain, UAE
    Office: 971 (03)7035418
    Mobile: 0504100534
    Email: lakshmi.ambika@fchs.ac.ae

    kesari
    kesari

    Dr. A. Lakshmi Kesari

    Senior Lecturer & Coordinator GRU
    General Requirements Program (GRU)
    Fatima College of Health Sciences
    Al Ain, UAE
    Office: 971 (03)7035418
    Mobile: 0504100534
    Email: lakshmi.ambika@fchs.ac.ae

    Dr. R. Radhakrishnan

    Scientist E-I
    Laboratory Medicine And Molecular Diagnostics
    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

    radhakrishnan
    radhakrishnan

    Dr. R. Radhakrishnan

    Scientist E-I
    Laboratory Medicine And Molecular Diagnostics
    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

    Dr. Srinivas G

    Scientist E
    Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology
    Trivandrum
    Phone: 471 2524689 (O), 2347918 (H), 8547547918 (Mob)
    Email: srinivasg@sctimst.ac.in; srinivasgpai@gmail.com

    srini
    srini

    Dr. Srinivas G

    Scientist E
    Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology
    Trivandrum
    Phone: 471 2524689 (O), 2347918 (H), 8547547918 (Mob)
    Email: srinivasg@sctimst.ac.in; srinivasgpai@gmail.com

    Dr. Pradip Nair

    Senior Scientific Manager
    Drug Discovery group
    R&D, Biocon India Limited, Bangalore
    Mob: 9945073336
    Email: pradip.nair@biocon.com

    pradip
    pradip

    Dr. Pradip Nair

    Senior Scientific Manager
    Drug Discovery group
    R&D, Biocon India Limited, Bangalore
    Mob: 9945073336
    Email: pradip.nair@biocon.com

    Dr. Sreevidya S

    sreevidya
    sreevidya

    Dr. Sreevidya S

    Dr. Priya Chacko

    Postdoctoral Fellow
    LV Prasad Eye Institute
    Hyderabad

    priya
    priya

    Dr. Priya Chacko

    Postdoctoral Fellow
    LV Prasad Eye Institute
    Hyderabad

    Dr. Thomas Joseph

    Senior Scientist
    TCS Innovation Labs
    Tata Consultancy Services

    thomas
    thomas

    Dr. Thomas Joseph

    Senior Scientist
    TCS Innovation Labs
    Tata Consultancy Services

    Dr. Bindhu O S

    Assistant Professor
    Dept of Biochemistry
    Centre for Post Greaduate Studies
    Jain University, Bangalore
    Mob: 9845084899
    Email: bindhupradip@yahoo.co.in
    os.bindhu@jainuniversity.ac.in

    bindhu
    bindhu

    Dr. Bindhu O S

    Assistant Professor
    Dept of Biochemistry
    Centre for Post Greaduate Studies
    Jain University, Bangalore
    Mob: 9845084899
    Email: bindhupradip@yahoo.co.in
    os.bindhu@jainuniversity.ac.in

    Dr. Divya Chandrasekhar

    divya
    divya

    Dr. Divya Chandrasekhar

    Dr. Sreekala Nair

    Senior Research Scientist B
    Jubilant Biosys
    Bangalore

    sreekala
    sreekala

    Dr. Sreekala Nair

    Senior Research Scientist B
    Jubilant Biosys
    Bangalore

    Dr. Ramkumar Hariharan

    Research Scientist
    Institute for Systems Biology
    Seattle, WA, USA

    ramkumar
    ramkumar

    Dr. Ramkumar Hariharan

    Research Scientist
    Institute for Systems Biology
    Seattle, WA, USA

    Dr. Surya Ramachandran

    Program Scientist
    Cardiovascular Disease Biology
    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

    surya
    surya

    Dr. Surya Ramachandran

    Program Scientist
    Cardiovascular Disease Biology
    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

    Dr. Santhi W S

    Assistant Professor of Biotechnology
    Department of Botany and Biotechnology
    Bishop Moore College
    Mavelikara – 690110
    Kerala, India

    santhi
    santhi

    Dr. Santhi W S

    Assistant Professor of Biotechnology
    Department of Botany and Biotechnology
    Bishop Moore College
    Mavelikara – 690110
    Kerala, India

    Dr. Preeti N R

    Senior Project Coordinator
    WHO Program on Pediatric Nutrition
    Christian Medical College
    Vellore

    preethi
    preethi

    Dr. Preeti N R

    Senior Project Coordinator
    WHO Program on Pediatric Nutrition
    Christian Medical College
    Vellore

    Dr. Reshmi G

    Research Scientist I (ICMR)
    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

    reshmi
    reshmi

    Dr. Reshmi G

    Research Scientist I (ICMR)
    Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology

    Dr. Indhu Hariharan

    indu
    indu

    Dr. Indhu Hariharan

    Dr. Vinitha Richard

    vinitha
    vinitha

    Dr. Vinitha Richard

    Dr.Ramdas K

    Professor, Chief
    Head & Neck Cancer Clinic
    Medical Superintendent
    Regional Cancer Centre
    Trivandrum

    ramdas
    ramdas

    Dr.Ramdas K

    Professor, Chief
    Head & Neck Cancer Clinic
    Medical Superintendent
    Regional Cancer Centre
    Trivandrum